Apple servers hacked

The management of the world’s most valuable company must be embarrassed enough for the incident that took place last year – Apple servers were hacked by a 16-year-old high school student.

Apple servers, which are widely believed to be amongst the most secure servers in the world, were hacked by a teenage from Melbourne, Australia. The hacker downloaded 90GB of secure files, including the extremely sensitive and secure authorized keys which are used to validate login access to multiple users accounts.

What’s funnier was the reason the teenage boy hacked Apple servers. The boy told authorities that he was a big-time Apple fan and had an aspiration to work for the world’s most valuable company.

But that’s not the only reason for Apple authorities to have felt embarrassed; The boy surprised the authorities by informing them that it was not the first time he hacked Apple servers. He said he hacked Apple servers multiple times in the last one years but Apple system administrators failed to stop their users’ data from being stolen.

However this time the boy ran out of luck; The company noticed intrusion this time and immediately informed the FBI, which in turn approached the Australian Federal Police (AFP).

Both FBI and AFP decided to keep everything under the cover until now as they believed that the boy is already too popular in the international hacking community and by discussing the case in detail could put the boy’s life on a potential risk as well.

In a press statement released by Apple today, the company has informed its customers that no personal data has been stolen or leaked. However, the company refrained from clarifying what kind of data and filed the teen has got his hands on.

Apple Servers Hacked: The “Hacky Hack Hack” Folder

The AFP had arrested the boy from his residence. Two Apple laptops, a mobile phone and a hard disk, reportedly used for hacking, were also seized.

AFP was surprised to see that all the invaluable files, sized 90GB, were stored on the hard disk in a folder called “hacky hack hack“. The authorities also found a lot of hacking tools and files that helped the teenage boy break into the mainframe of Apple, repeatedly.

Apple requested authorities not to disclose the methods the teenage boy employed to hack Apple servers. Interestingly, investigators said that those methods worked flawlessly until administrators at Apple noticed and blocked those.

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