72% College Students Never Use Their Smartphone For Reading Books: [Infographic]


It’s clear that Smartphone is going to be an important commodity for people in upcoming years. A recent survey (conducted by Online Colleges) has reportedly stated that Smartphone users rose to 50.4% of consumers in the U.S. It has been noticed that younger mobile phone users across the country are more likely to use their device for real-time activities.

Mobile phone owners (ages 18-29) are comparatively more likely to use their device for ‘met up with other’, ‘solving unexpected problem’, ‘decision making activities’ (whether or not to visit a business, such as restaurant), ‘looked up something to settle an argument’, ‘looked up a sport score’, ‘got up-to-the-minute traffic’ and public transit info than elder age group folks across the country.

It has been seemed that the college students (having Smartphone) are unwilling to keep themselves away from their mobile handset. They often use their Smartphone while they are at school (during breaks, lunch, boring meeting classes etc) and commuting via bus, train, or car. 55% college students said during survey period that they used to access their Smartphone while waiting in the line (coffee, shop, grocery store etc.). However, college students are more precautious to use the device while they are exercising and driving.

Indeed, it’s interesting to know about the popularity of mobile operating systems among college students. In the U.S., 40% students want to own iOS device, followed by BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and palm having majority of just 26%,22%, 8%and 4% respectively.

College students often use their smartphone for text messaging (81%), reading email (77%), searching for specific information (67%), taking on the phone (64%), viewing contents on the social networks (52%) and checking whether (48%). On the contrary, they seldom use to access the device for chatting, playing video games and watching videos. Interestingly, 72% students never used their Smartphone for the reading purpose.

See the infographic (below) for the further information:

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