Google Inc. has ramped up its commitment to cloud computing with the announcement that it is working on a new range of Chrome books – which will use the firm’s cloud-based Chrome OS.

The personal computer will run on Google’s Chrome operating system, which is cloud-enabled. The news source reports that the system will allow users to access popular virtual applications, including Google Docs and Google Business Apps.

All the applications and storage they require will be hosted in the cloud by Google.

Chrome OS, the search-engine giant’s Web-based platform for computers, eschews the traditional, localized platform and long-running BIOS startup process of Microsoft Windows laptops for Web applications and machines with minimal Flash storage that load within 8 seconds.

There will be several administrative advantages to the Chrome book, which will be rented out to companies for $28 a month, states the media organization. Administrators will have complete control over their networks, which may greatly boost the security measures of a company’s cloud service.

Essentially, the announcement by Google signifies its commitment to the enterprise hardware side of cloud computing. Previously, the online search engine offered applications for cloud service providers to integrate into their stacks. The overwhelming public and enterprise success of these applications may have played a large role in the company’s decision to pursue more cloud-centric business strategies.

Google has already signed up a number of partners – including Samsung and Acer – to produce the new devices.

Google claims the Chrome book’s cloud will be a secure system. Its OS platform will implement key security measures for the new enterprise hardware, including automatic updates, data encryption and recovery services.

Privacy and security has remained a big issue for Cloud computing especially after Sony’s massive data security breach just a few weeks ago. Can Google deliver its promise on security? We will have to wait and watch.